Skip to content

Conductive Electronic Circuit Patterns with Liquid Metal Jetting

  • today
  • access_time 10:30 - 10:55 AM EDT
  • location_onRoom 141
  • blur_circularConference
  • monetization_onPaid Upgrade
  • schoolOptimization

Liquid metal droplet jetting (LMJ) is a unique metal additive manufacturing technology being developed by Xerox with contributions from Rochester Institute of Technology's AMPrint Center. The process feeds metal wire feedstock into a micro-crucible where it is melted and gravity fed into a nozzle. Molten metal droplets are ejected on demand in the desired pattern. Although LMJ was originally developed as a metal AM process, it has successfully been used to print electronic (PE) circuit patterns. This audience will learn about considerable progress that has been made in jetting strategies for PE as well as print parameter optimization to produce electronic traces whose conductivities match that of the bulk metal and which have outstanding adhesion to a wide range of substrates. The talk will conclude with discussion the potential for complex non-planar printing as well as multilayer additive electronics. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore liquid metal jetting and how the technology has evolved since its inception.
  • Learn about considerable progress that has been made in jetting strategies for PE as well as print parameter optimization to produce electronic traces whose conductivities match bulk metal.
  • Discuss the potential for complex non-planar printing as well as multilayer additive electronics.
  • Denis Cormier Dr
    Professor, Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
    Kate Gleason College of Engineering, RIT